Keeping Your Pet Safe in Hot Weather

It’s essential to keep your pet’s safety in mind during the warmer summer months—our cats and dogs aren’t particularly well-equipped to handle hot weather! Here, your Marietta, GA vet gives you a few basic tips for keeping Fido or Fluffy safe when it’s hot.

Constant Hydration

Rule number one: keep your pet properly hydrated. This is important whether your pet is spending time indoors or out. Give them a large dish of cool, fresh water at all times, and check it frequently to see if it needs refilled or refreshed.

Indoor Time

Don’t keep your pet outdoors for hours on end—it’s only inviting dangerous heat exhaustion and dehydration. Instead, allow your pet to stay indoors in the cool air conditioning, where they’ll be safe and happy.

Exercise Tips            

Try exercising your animal friend in the cooler morning or evening hours, when the sun isn’t directly overhead and temperatures are a bit lower. It’s one of the easiest ways to make sure your pet stays safe while still getting the physical activity they need!

For more hot-weather safety tips for pets, contact your veterinary clinic Marietta, GA. We’re here to help with all of your most important pet care needs!

Beware of Xylitol Poisoning in Pets

Have you ever heard of xylitol? It’s an artificial sugar used in many baked goods, candies, and gum, and it’s highly toxic to pets! Learn more below from a Greensboro, NC veterinarian.

Symptoms

Symptoms of xylitol poisoning can start to appear only 30 short minutes or so after initial ingestion. Symptoms include lethargy, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, coma, and—without treatment—even death.

Treatment

If you see or suspect that your pet has eaten a product that contains xylitol, rush your animal companion to the nearest veterinary emergency room. The stomach may need to be flushed, or activated charcoal may be administered to stop the poison from absorbing any further. From there, a pet might need supportive measures like fluid replacement or oxygen supplementation as they recover.

Preventing Poisoning

Prevent poisoning in the first place by tightly restricting your pet’s access to any and all sweet treats. Don’t leave such items out on countertops or the kitchen table—instead, keep them inside closed cabinets or the refrigerator so that pets can’t gain access.

Would you like more information on xylitol or other poisonous products for pets? We’re here to help! Contact your pet clinic Greensboro, NC today to learn more.

What to Do if Your Dog Sheds Too Much

Does your canine companion leave excessive amounts of fur all over the house? While shedding is simply a natural part of life for most dogs, too much can be a problem! Here, your Colorado Springs, CO veterinarian tells you what to do.

Help With Grooming

You’ll be surprised at the difference that daily brushing can make when it comes to shedding. Not only does brushing your animal friend help trap loose and dead fur in the brush itself, preventing it from winding up on your carpets and floors, it spreads essential skin oils through the coat. This moisturizes the fur naturally to cut back on shedding at the get-go.

Diet Change

If your dog doesn’t receive the proper nutrients from food, his skin health will suffer and shedding may increase. Ask your veterinarian if your pooch’s current diet is up to par—if it’s not, it might be time for a change.

See Your Veterinarian

If you still can’t seem to get your dog’s excessive shedding under control, make an appointment to have your dog examined at the vet’s office. Medical issues could be to blame!

For more information on your dog’s grooming needs, call your veterinarians Colorado Springs, CO.

What to Put in Your Pet’s First-Aid Kit

It’s always a good idea to have a first-aid kit just for your pet. After all, you just never know when an emergency might strike! The question is, what do you include? Your Livonia, MI vet fills you in below:

The Essentials

Make sure to pack first-aid essentials like gauze, bandages, a pet-safe disinfectant, medical tape, a few tongue depressors, a pet thermometer, nail clippers, a styptic powder or pen to staunch bleeding, and a few soft towels. Also, include several pairs of latex gloves to protect your hands.

Medical Records

It’s a great idea to seal your pet’s medical records—proof of vaccination, proof of ownership, documentation of recent medical procedures, etc.—in a waterproof bag and pack it into the first-aid kit. These documents can be essential should you have to visit a new vet’s office or shelter facility.

Pet Medications

If your pet takes medications to treat or manage a condition, pack a supply of these in the first-aid kit. This way, you always know where to find your pet’s medications in a pinch! Check the expiration dates periodically.

Would you like help assembling a first-aid kit for your animal companion? Contact your vet clinic Livonia, MI.

Electing a Leash for Your Dog

Are you new to dog ownership? It can be difficult to know what sort of leash to select when you’re visiting the pet store. Below, your Savannah, GA veterinarian gives you a crash course:

The Standard Leash

Most dogs will be just fine with a standard leash. These are typically about six feet long and are made of nylon or perhaps leather. They have a loop at one end, and a clasping mechanism at the other to attach to your dog’s collar.

Retractable Leashes

Retractable leashes are currently quite popular; they feature a spring-loaded handle, allowing your dog to move away from you as they please until you press a button, stopping the leash from retracting further. Just be careful not to let your dog get too far away from you!

Training Leashes

Training leashes may be extra short, long, or made of a particular material to help your dog learn certain commands or maneuvers. Generally speaking, it’s not necessary to use a training leash with your dog unless directed to do so by your veterinarian or a dog-training professional.

Would you like a recommendation on a good leash for your dog’s needs? Talk to your vet Savannah, GA today.

Pet Toxins in Your Home or Apartment

Were you aware that there are most likely multiple pet toxins in your home right now? It’s bound to happen, regardless of how conscientious you are about pet safety! The trick is knowing what to look out for—learn more here from an Indianapolis, IN veterinary professional.

Toxic Foods

There is a long list of potentially harmful foods for pets, including onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, grapes, raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, alcoholic beverages, caffeinated foods and beverages, avocado, and much more. Don’t leave anything harmful within your pet’s reach.

Cleaning Supplies

Household disinfectants, bleach-based products, furniture polish, carpet shampoo, air fresheners… the list of potentially harmful cleaning supplies goes on and on. It’s safest to keep your pet elsewhere when cleaning and keep the supply closet shut tightly at all times.

Human Medications

Did you know that aspirin, cough syrup, antidepressants, and a wide variety of over-the-counter or prescription drugs can harm a pet who swallows too much? Don’t allow your pet to come in contact with any type of human medicine.

Keep the number of your veterinary clinic Indianapolis, IN on hand to call in the event of an emergency. We’re here for all of your pet care needs!

Giving Your Dog Pill Medication

If you own a dog, it’s a safe bet that you’ll have to give them a pill at some point. That can be much easier said than done! Your Plano, TX veterinarian gives you a few tips below:

Hide in Food

Ask your veterinarian if your dog’s pill is safe to be given with food. If it is, you can try hiding it in the center of a glob of wet dog food, a soft dog treat, or in a roll of deli meat. With any luck, your dog will gobble up the tasty morsel without even realizing there was medication inside!

Crushing

In some cases, you can crush your dog’s pill up and sprinkle it over food. Make sure to ask your veterinarian first, though—crushing may render some medications ineffective, or it could introduce the medication to your dog’s system too quickly.

Manual Administration

If the above methods don’t work, you will have to give your dog the pill manually. Pry open your dog’s jaws with one hand, then place the pill far back in the mouth. Close the jaws and stroke the throat to stimulate swallowing.

For help administering your dog’s pill, contact your animal hospital Plano, TX.