Animal Adoption Myths

Are you considering adopting a pet in the near future? It’s important that you don’t believe everything you hear when it comes to adoption. Below, a Savannah, GA vet sets the record straight on a few common myths.

Shelter Pets Aren’t Well-Behaved

Some make the mistake of thinking that a pet wouldn’t find themselves in a shelter at all if they were a well-behaved animal. This couldn’t be further from the truth—most shelter pets are wonderfully mannered and came to a shelter for a different reason, like abandonment or uncontrolled breeding.

Shelter Pets Are Old

There are pets of every age—puppies and kittens, middle-aged companions, and senior pets—to be found in animal shelters. They’re not all old, unwanted pets! If you’re looking for a younger companion, take a tour through your local shelters.

Shelter Pets Are Expensive

Shelter pets are in fact far less expensive on average than purchasing directly from a pet store or breeder. They also likely already have vaccinations, are spayed or neutered, and may even have a microchip—this saves you plenty on initial costs!

Want to know more about adoption? Does your new companion need veterinary care? Call your vet clinic Savannah, GA.

Your Kitten’s Diet

Are you the new owner of a kitten? Thinking of adopting a young cat in the near future? Diet is one of the most important parts of your new pet’s proper growth. Here, your Plano, TX veterinarian provides some guidelines.

Newborns

Newborn kittens should still be with their mother to receive milk, but if they’re not, a synthetic milk substitute will need to be given. These are widely available at pet stores and some retail outlets; ask your vet for a recommendation.

After a few weeks, you’ll be able to start combining milk with dry or wet kitten food. Ask your vet for precise details.

3-6 Months of Age

At this stage, your kitten should be eating kitten formula food at all times. Talk to your vet to find out about the proper portion size. Keep in mind that your kitten will probably eat whatever food type you choose at this stage—wet or dry—for the rest of their life!

6 Months and Older

Have your kitten continue eating kitten food until about a year of age. Then, you will gradually start transitioning them to an adult food.

For more information on kitten nutrition, call your vet clinic Plano, TX.