How to Tell if Your Bird Isn’t Feeling Well

Are you the proud owner of a feathered companion? It’s up to you to take notice when your bird isn’t feeling their best. Below, your vet Ellicott City, MD tells you about a few common signs of illness in birds so that you can take quick action.

Cere Signs

Your bird’s cere is essentially their nose; it’s the area above the beak where the nostrils are found. If you see discharge coming from this area, or notice dried crusts around the nostrils, it’s time to act. This could be a sign of respiratory issues, infection, and more.

Loss of Appetite

Is your bird giving the cold shoulder to his food? It’s safe to say that a loss of appetite isn’t a good sign. If your bird seems to be shunning his food for longer than a day or two, it’s worth a call to the vet’s office. Your pet might be suffering from disease, infection, or injury.

Ruffled Feathers

Although birds ruffle their feathers occasionally, they don’t typically keep them that way. Birds who have left the feathers ruffled for 24 hours or longer should be examined by your veterinarian!

Schedule an appointment with your pet clinic Ellicott City, MD.

Keeping Your Dog Safe at the Beach

Have you ever taken your canine companion along to the beach? It’s a lot of fun! Just make sure your dog stays safe and sound. Use these quick tips from your vet Marietta, GA to do just that:

Heat and Sun

The major danger of the beach for dogs is the high heat, humidity, and bright sunlight. It’s all too easy for a dog to experience heatstroke, dehydration, or heat exhaustion if they’re left outside too long—don’t linger on the beach all day, and bring along the fresh water for your dog to drink. You can also try a canine-formulated sunscreen.

Water Safety Tips

If your dog likes swimming, it’s best to go in the ocean with him for support. Never let him swim too far out from shore, as dangerous tides and currents can quickly overpower even the best of our canine swimmers.

The Final Rinse

When each day is over, rinse out your dog’s coat thoroughly with fresh water from a garden hose or the tub. It’s very important to get rid of all that sand and salt!

For more safety tips for dogs, give your vets Marietta, GA a call today. We’re always here to help!

Common Poisons for Dogs

As you probably know, dogs aren’t picky about what they decide to inspect and potentially gobble up. It’s all too easy for your canine companion to ingest something he shouldn’t! Below, your veterinarian North Phoenix, AZ tells you about some of the most common hazards:

Human Foods

All kinds of human food—onions, garlic, shallots, scallions, chives, grapes, raisins, chocolate, candy, alcohol, caffeinated foods and beverages, avocado, and much more—aren’t good for dogs. Don’t allow your pooch in the kitchen while cooking or eating, and don’t leave harmful foods out on countertops.

Cleaning Supplies

Did you know that most standard cleaning supplies—everything from household disinfectants and bleach-based products to air fresheners, carpet shampoo, and furniture polish—can harm a dog who manages to ingest it? Keep your supply closet shut at all times, and move dogs elsewhere if you’re using strong chemicals.

Pesticides

Pesticides used to ward off insects or rodents aren’t just harmful to the pests they’re designed to kill. They can easily poison a dog! Use pesticides with extreme caution, and consider alternative methods that are safer for pets.

Talk to your vet North Phoenix, AZ to learn more about keeping your dog safe at home.

Toxic Human Foods for Cats

There are plenty of human foods that aren’t safe for pets. The trick is having your cat avoid harmful substances so that they stay healthy! Learn about three common offenders below from your Rochester, NY veterinarian.

Chocolate

Chocolate, as you probably know, is a dangerous poison for our feline friends. All types of chocolate contain chemicals like caffeine and theobromine that don’t agree with animals. Never leave chocolate or foods that contain chocolate on countertops or the table, where your cat might be able to get at it.

Onions

Did you know that onions, as well as related foods like garlic, chives, and shallots, are highly toxic to cats? While it’s not likely that your cat will go out of their way to ingest onions, it’s not worth the risk. Put these foods in places where even the craftiest of cats won’t have access.

Alcohol

Alcohol affects cats just like it affects us! There’s a big difference, though: it only takes very small amounts to do serious harm to your feline friend. Never leave drinks unattended, and make sure cats can’t sneak a sip; this goes for beer, liquor, wine, and champagne.

Call your vet clinic Rochester, NY to learn more.