All posts by topdusr

Keeping Your Dog Safe at the Beach

Have you ever taken your canine companion along to the beach? It’s a lot of fun! Just make sure your dog stays safe and sound. Use these quick tips from your vet Marietta, GA to do just that:

Heat and Sun

The major danger of the beach for dogs is the high heat, humidity, and bright sunlight. It’s all too easy for a dog to experience heatstroke, dehydration, or heat exhaustion if they’re left outside too long—don’t linger on the beach all day, and bring along the fresh water for your dog to drink. You can also try a canine-formulated sunscreen.

Water Safety Tips

If your dog likes swimming, it’s best to go in the ocean with him for support. Never let him swim too far out from shore, as dangerous tides and currents can quickly overpower even the best of our canine swimmers.

The Final Rinse

When each day is over, rinse out your dog’s coat thoroughly with fresh water from a garden hose or the tub. It’s very important to get rid of all that sand and salt!

For more safety tips for dogs, give your vets Marietta, GA a call today. We’re always here to help!

Common Poisons for Dogs

As you probably know, dogs aren’t picky about what they decide to inspect and potentially gobble up. It’s all too easy for your canine companion to ingest something he shouldn’t! Below, your veterinarian North Phoenix, AZ tells you about some of the most common hazards:

Human Foods

All kinds of human food—onions, garlic, shallots, scallions, chives, grapes, raisins, chocolate, candy, alcohol, caffeinated foods and beverages, avocado, and much more—aren’t good for dogs. Don’t allow your pooch in the kitchen while cooking or eating, and don’t leave harmful foods out on countertops.

Cleaning Supplies

Did you know that most standard cleaning supplies—everything from household disinfectants and bleach-based products to air fresheners, carpet shampoo, and furniture polish—can harm a dog who manages to ingest it? Keep your supply closet shut at all times, and move dogs elsewhere if you’re using strong chemicals.

Pesticides

Pesticides used to ward off insects or rodents aren’t just harmful to the pests they’re designed to kill. They can easily poison a dog! Use pesticides with extreme caution, and consider alternative methods that are safer for pets.

Talk to your vet North Phoenix, AZ to learn more about keeping your dog safe at home.

Toxic Human Foods for Cats

There are plenty of human foods that aren’t safe for pets. The trick is having your cat avoid harmful substances so that they stay healthy! Learn about three common offenders below from your Rochester, NY veterinarian.

Chocolate

Chocolate, as you probably know, is a dangerous poison for our feline friends. All types of chocolate contain chemicals like caffeine and theobromine that don’t agree with animals. Never leave chocolate or foods that contain chocolate on countertops or the table, where your cat might be able to get at it.

Onions

Did you know that onions, as well as related foods like garlic, chives, and shallots, are highly toxic to cats? While it’s not likely that your cat will go out of their way to ingest onions, it’s not worth the risk. Put these foods in places where even the craftiest of cats won’t have access.

Alcohol

Alcohol affects cats just like it affects us! There’s a big difference, though: it only takes very small amounts to do serious harm to your feline friend. Never leave drinks unattended, and make sure cats can’t sneak a sip; this goes for beer, liquor, wine, and champagne.

Call your vet clinic Rochester, NY to learn more.

Animal Adoption Myths

Are you considering adopting a pet in the near future? It’s important that you don’t believe everything you hear when it comes to adoption. Below, a Savannah, GA vet sets the record straight on a few common myths.

Shelter Pets Aren’t Well-Behaved

Some make the mistake of thinking that a pet wouldn’t find themselves in a shelter at all if they were a well-behaved animal. This couldn’t be further from the truth—most shelter pets are wonderfully mannered and came to a shelter for a different reason, like abandonment or uncontrolled breeding.

Shelter Pets Are Old

There are pets of every age—puppies and kittens, middle-aged companions, and senior pets—to be found in animal shelters. They’re not all old, unwanted pets! If you’re looking for a younger companion, take a tour through your local shelters.

Shelter Pets Are Expensive

Shelter pets are in fact far less expensive on average than purchasing directly from a pet store or breeder. They also likely already have vaccinations, are spayed or neutered, and may even have a microchip—this saves you plenty on initial costs!

Want to know more about adoption? Does your new companion need veterinary care? Call your vet clinic Savannah, GA.

Your Kitten’s Diet

Are you the new owner of a kitten? Thinking of adopting a young cat in the near future? Diet is one of the most important parts of your new pet’s proper growth. Here, your Plano, TX veterinarian provides some guidelines.

Newborns

Newborn kittens should still be with their mother to receive milk, but if they’re not, a synthetic milk substitute will need to be given. These are widely available at pet stores and some retail outlets; ask your vet for a recommendation.

After a few weeks, you’ll be able to start combining milk with dry or wet kitten food. Ask your vet for precise details.

3-6 Months of Age

At this stage, your kitten should be eating kitten formula food at all times. Talk to your vet to find out about the proper portion size. Keep in mind that your kitten will probably eat whatever food type you choose at this stage—wet or dry—for the rest of their life!

6 Months and Older

Have your kitten continue eating kitten food until about a year of age. Then, you will gradually start transitioning them to an adult food.

For more information on kitten nutrition, call your vet clinic Plano, TX.

All About Catnip

We’ve all heard of catnip. How much do you know, though, about your feline friends’ preferred plant? Below, your Indianapolis, IN veterinarian answers your most frequently asked questions.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is an herb, classified in the same plant grouping as mint. It grows in the wild, although the catnip you’ll purchase in a pet store is a dried and processed version which looks similar to dried oregano or basil flakes. Catnip can also be infused into sprays or included in cat toys.

Why Does it Affect Cats?

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical called nepetalactone. It’s this substance that causes a reaction in your cat’s brain. The reaction is completely safe, and the effects will most likely wear off in just a minute or two.

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Have you tried out catnip on your cat to no avail? There’s no need to worry; your cat is fine. If a cat doesn’t possess a certain gene, inherited from their parents, they won’t respond to catnip at all!

Does your feline friend need vaccinations or a veterinary examination? We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs. Call your vet clinic Indianapolis, IN.

How to Improve Your Dog’s Coat Quality

How is your dog’s coat of fur looking recently? Our canine companions can occasionally use a little help in the grooming department! Here, your Moorpark, CA veterinarian tells you about three quick ways to improve Fido’s coat.

Brushing

Run a brush through your dog’s coat on a daily basis. It will remove loose and dead fur from the coat and spread essential skin oils through the fur, moisturizing it naturally and cutting down on shedding. Ask your vet about the right brush and/or bristle type for your dog’s particular coat.

Bathing

Bathe your dog occasionally to keep things fresh and clean; always use a canine-formulated shampoo. Also, make sure you don’t overdo bathing—if you bathe Fido too frequently, the skin will dry out and the fur will become coarse.

Diet Upgrade

Your dog’s diet and nutrition has a lot to do with his coat quality. If your pet doesn’t receive the right nutrients, the skin and fur will suffer! Consult your veterinarian about upgrading your dog to a premium, nutritionally balanced diet that is appropriate for his age, breed, and weight.

Do you want more tips on maintaining your dog’s coat? Contact your veterinary clinic Moorpark, CA veterinary clinic for help.

How to Get Rid of Pet Odors

Let’s face the facts—pets can be a little smelly sometimes. If your home is starting to smell a little too much like your dog or cat, it’s time to change things! Here, your Cy-Fair vet offers a few expert tips.

Grooming

Brush your pet on a daily basis. You’ll be amazed at the difference you’ll see! Brushing helps control odors by getting rid of grime and loose hair. It also spreads essential skin oils through the coat to moisturize hair naturally. The occasional bath, always using a pet-formulated shampoo, is another great way to minimize smells.

Odor Neutralizers

Air fresheners mask over smells, letting them return once the scent of the product has worn off. Odor neutralizers are different—they combat the enzymes that cause odors at the root. Ask your vet for a recommendation, and browse the selection at your local pet supply shop.

Visit the Vet

Did you know that a variety of medical issues—skin infection, parasitic infestation, and more—can cause your pet to smell? If you can’t seem to correct your pet’s bad odor, it is time to see the vet!

For more information on pet odor control, contact your veterinarian Cy-Fair for help.

Onion Toxicity and Your Pet

Did you know that onions are a dangerous pet toxin? Our canine friends are the most likely to be harmed by onions, but that may be due to their indiscriminate tastes. Learn more about onion toxicity and your pet from an Aurora, CO veterinarian:

Why Are Onions Poisonous?

Onions, as well as related foods in the allium family like garlic, chives, scallions, and shallots, contain sulfur compounds that don’t agree with our animal companions. If your pet ingests an onion, symptoms like lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and worse may occur! In addition, symptoms may be delayed by hours or even days after initial ingestion.

What if My Pet Eats an Onion?

If you know or suspect that your pet has eaten an onion or related food, rush them to the nearest veterinary emergency room for treatment. The stomach may need to be flushed, or activated charcoal may be given to slow the toxin’s absorption. Your pet might need supportive measures like fluid therapy during recovery.

How Can I Prevent Poisoning?

Prevent onion poisoning by storing onions and similar foods in the cabinets or refrigerator where they belong. This way, pets don’t have access!

Call your vets Aurora, CO for more information.

Signs of Dental Trouble in Dogs and Cats

Dental trouble is rather common amongst our domesticated pets. One in ten pets will deal with a dental issue at one point or another! To learn about some of the signs of dental health issues, read on as your Lafayette, LA vet elaborates.

Loss of Appetite

Have you noticed that your pet isn’t eating the way they used to? Perhaps they’ve shunned their food dish altogether. This could be a sign of dental trouble, as well as an indication of a whole host of other conditions. It’s time to see your vet!

Behavioral Changes

Is your pet acting out aggressively when he or she is usually docile and friendly? Does it seem as though they’re shying away from any physical contact? Pain in the mouth could be the root cause. It’s worth a call to the vet’s office to make sure your pet doesn’t need treatment.

Rotten Breath

While your pet’s breath isn’t likely to smell wonderful, it also shouldn’t smell rotten. This could be a sign of rotting teeth or periodontitis (dental disease). Don’t delay—make an appointment at your vet’s office right away to have your pet examined.

For further advice, contact your pet clinic Lafayette LA today.