Category Archives: Cats Care

Dog and Cat Pest Control

There are a variety of pesky pests out there just waiting to latch on to our animal companions and start wreaking havoc. That’s why it’s important to prevent the problem initially! Below, learn more about the most common types of pet pests from a vet Cherry Hill, NJ.


Fleas can quickly cause a serious infestation and lead to symptoms like balding, skin infection, and more. They can also infest your family’s bedding and clothing! Keep your pet on a year-round flea medication to ward these pesky critters off.


Ticks carry dangerous diseases like Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, erlichiosis, and many others. Fortunately, flea and tick preventatives are most often bundled together. Ask your vet for a high-quality flea-and-tick medication that will suit your pet’s needs and keep them pest-free.


Heartworms, roundworms, flatworms, hookworms… there are many types of worms that can infest your pet and start causing serious health problems. A heartworm preventative will keep almost all of them at bay—contact your vet right away if your dog or cat isn’t already on a heartworm preventative.

Want more advice on keeping your pet pest-free? Give your animal hospital Cherry Hill, NJ a call today.

What Your Cat’s Tail Movements Mean

Did you know that cats use their tails as a primary mode of communication, in addition to vocalization? You can try and determine what your cat is thinking just by looking at her tail! Learn more here from a veterinarian Marietta, GA.

The Hoisted Tail

Often, you’ll see your cat’s tail hoisted straight up in the air. This typically means that your cat is feeling confident and self-assured. Give your cat a bit of love; she’s likely to be very friendly when the tail is held like this.

The Puffed Tail

Of course, you probably know what a puffed tail means. It’s usually accompanied with wide eyes and a hiss; this is your cat’s way of looking bigger and scarier in order to ward off a perceived threat.

The Tail Wrap

Have you ever seen your cat wrap her tail gently around your leg, or perhaps around another pet in the house? This is your cat’s way of showing affection, much like we would wrap an arm around a loved one.

Not all cats are the same, of course! Contact your vets Marietta, GA directly for more insight into your cat’s unique behavior and care needs. We’re here to help!

Get Your Cat to Use Her Scratching Post

Is your feline friend scratching up your furniture and carpets? An important part of the solution is to give her an appropriate scratching surface: a scratching post! Use these tips from a veterinarian Livonia, MI to get your cat to use her post.


Every time that your cat scratches something that you don’t want her to, tell her “no” in a firm voice and move her physically to the scratching post. Do this enough, and your cat will get the hint: scratching on the board is what she wants to do!


Always make sure your cat’s scratching post is placed in an area where she spends time frequently. It won’t do to have the scratching post near the litter box, where your cat doesn’t spend a lot of time. In most homes, a living room or family room works best.


Try sprinkling raw catnip, available at most pet supply shops and certain retail stores, on your cat’s scratching post. This is a great way to entice many of our feline friends into using their post properly!

Need help with your cat’s scratching problem? We’re here for you. Schedule an appointment to see your animal hospital Livonia, MI.

Toxic Human Foods for Cats

There are plenty of human foods that aren’t safe for pets. The trick is having your cat avoid harmful substances so that they stay healthy! Learn about three common offenders below from your Rochester, NY veterinarian.


Chocolate, as you probably know, is a dangerous poison for our feline friends. All types of chocolate contain chemicals like caffeine and theobromine that don’t agree with animals. Never leave chocolate or foods that contain chocolate on countertops or the table, where your cat might be able to get at it.


Did you know that onions, as well as related foods like garlic, chives, and shallots, are highly toxic to cats? While it’s not likely that your cat will go out of their way to ingest onions, it’s not worth the risk. Put these foods in places where even the craftiest of cats won’t have access.


Alcohol affects cats just like it affects us! There’s a big difference, though: it only takes very small amounts to do serious harm to your feline friend. Never leave drinks unattended, and make sure cats can’t sneak a sip; this goes for beer, liquor, wine, and champagne.

Call your vet clinic Rochester, NY to learn more.

Your Kitten’s Diet

Are you the new owner of a kitten? Thinking of adopting a young cat in the near future? Diet is one of the most important parts of your new pet’s proper growth. Here, your Plano, TX veterinarian provides some guidelines.


Newborn kittens should still be with their mother to receive milk, but if they’re not, a synthetic milk substitute will need to be given. These are widely available at pet stores and some retail outlets; ask your vet for a recommendation.

After a few weeks, you’ll be able to start combining milk with dry or wet kitten food. Ask your vet for precise details.

3-6 Months of Age

At this stage, your kitten should be eating kitten formula food at all times. Talk to your vet to find out about the proper portion size. Keep in mind that your kitten will probably eat whatever food type you choose at this stage—wet or dry—for the rest of their life!

6 Months and Older

Have your kitten continue eating kitten food until about a year of age. Then, you will gradually start transitioning them to an adult food.

For more information on kitten nutrition, call your vet clinic Plano, TX.

All About Catnip

We’ve all heard of catnip. How much do you know, though, about your feline friends’ preferred plant? Below, your Indianapolis, IN veterinarian answers your most frequently asked questions.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is an herb, classified in the same plant grouping as mint. It grows in the wild, although the catnip you’ll purchase in a pet store is a dried and processed version which looks similar to dried oregano or basil flakes. Catnip can also be infused into sprays or included in cat toys.

Why Does it Affect Cats?

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical called nepetalactone. It’s this substance that causes a reaction in your cat’s brain. The reaction is completely safe, and the effects will most likely wear off in just a minute or two.

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Have you tried out catnip on your cat to no avail? There’s no need to worry; your cat is fine. If a cat doesn’t possess a certain gene, inherited from their parents, they won’t respond to catnip at all!

Does your feline friend need vaccinations or a veterinary examination? We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs. Call your vet clinic Indianapolis, IN.

Why Your Cat Has Shunned Her Litterbox

Has your cat been eliminating outside of her litterbox? It’s not uncommon for our feline friends to develop an aversion to their bathroom! Below, your Colorado Springs, CO vet tells you about some common reasons this may be happening and how to fix them.


Where your cat’s bathroom is located is very important. Put it in a quiet, out-of-the-way place where Fluffy won’t be disturbed. No one wants to do their business in a crowded, noisy area!


Who wants to use a dirty bathroom? Not your cat, that’s for sure! Make sure you scoop out your cat’s litterbox on a regular basis to remove waste, and change the litter out entirely every week to make sure things stay fresh and clean. Cats may avoid their litterbox entirely if it’s not up to their standards!

Negative Conditioning

If your cat was startled while using her box earlier in life, she might be afraid to use it now. Talk to your veterinary professional or an animal behaviorist if you think your cat is having this problem.

Want more advice on your cat’s bathroom habits or behavior? Don’t hesitate to call your vet Colorado Springs, CO. We’re here for you!

Caring for Senior Cats

If your cat is about eight years of age or older, they’re considered to be in their senior years. Now more than ever, they need special care and attention to stay happy and healthy! Here, your Pickerington, OH vet gives you a few quick tips.

Proper Diet

All aging cats should be eating a specially formulated senior diet. This food has the right balances of nutrients that your older cat needs for good health. Ask your vet to recommend a good choice, and also be sure to ask about the proper portion size for your cat’s needs.

Napping Spots

Now more than ever, your cat is going to be sleeping for most her days. Be sure to provide plenty of comfy napping spots for your cat’s enjoyment, complete with soft blankets and a few fun toys.

Veterinary Check-Ups

When your senior cat is examined regularly by her veterinarian, any health issues can be diagnosed and treated early on. This way, they’re corrected before they get any worse. It’s the best way to keep your cat healthy long-term!

Does your cat need an exam? Want to know more about your cat’s healthcare needs as she ages? Call your vet Pickerington, OH.

Lily Poisoning in Cats

Lily flowers are a known cat toxin—is your feline friend at risk? Learn more about lily poisoning in cats as your Rochester, NY veterinarian elaborates below:

What Types of Lilies Are Poisonous?

Not all lilies are poisonous, but it’s not worth the risk to keep them around if you own a cat. The most common offenders include Easter lilies, lily of the valley, tiger lilies, calla lilies, day lilies, Asiatic lilies, and peace lilies.

What are the Symptoms of Poisoning?

Mouth irritation, excess drooling, loss of appetite, and vomiting are the most common signs of lily poisoning in cats. Increased urination or a lack of urination can also occur since lily poisoning affects your cat’s kidneys.

Treating lily poisoning may involve administration of activated charcoal to stop the toxin’s absorption, induced vomiting, IV fluid treatment, and more.

How Can I Prevent Poisoning?

Fortunately, it’s not difficult to prevent lily poisoning. Simply make sure you don’t keep lilies in bouquets or flower arrangements inside your home, and remove lilies from your garden or landscaping outside. This way, there’s no risk to your cat!

Want more information on lily poisoning and your cat? Contact your vets Rochester, NY for help.

Exercising Your Cat at Home

It’s all too easy for our feline friends to remain sedentary, overeat, and gain excess weight. Don’t let your cat pack on the pounds—exercise them every day to keep them fit! Learn how to do just that from a Lansing, MI veterinarian.

Cat Towers

Cat tower structures have multiple platforms from which cats can jump to and from. Many even come with built-in toys and scratching posts. They’re a great way to provide your cat with quality exercise, even when you’re not at home!


All cats need a few good cat toys to keep them occupied. It’s also a great way to get them moving! Even a string dangled in front of Fluffy’s face will do. Ask your veterinarian about other great toys that your feline friend will love.

Harness and Leash

Try venturing outside your home; did you know that some cats enjoy being walked on a harness and leash? You’ll need to purchase this special equipment from a local pet supply store. Take it slow at first to make sure that your cat is comfortable—not all cats enjoy the outdoors!

For more great tips on exercising your cat, call your pet clinic Lansing, MI today.