Category Archives: Cats Care

Keeping Your Cat’s Breath Fresh

If you’ve ever smelled your cat’s breath, you’re probably aware that it isn’t quite like a field of lilies. Your cat’s breath might not be wonderful, but there are a few things you can do to make it a little better! Your veterinarian Rochester, NY tells you more below:

Brushing

Try brushing your cat’s teeth using a specialized cat toothbrush and a toothpaste formulated specifically for cats. Focus only on the outer tooth surfaces, where plaque tends to accumulate. By removing much of the plaque and bacteria that cause odors, you’re helping your cat’s breath stay minty fresh!

Dental Chews

Dental chew items give your cat’s teeth and gums a healthy workout, and they help to scrape away loose plaque from the teeth before it can harden into dangerous tartar. This helps keep the whole mouth healthy and stave off gum disease, gingivitis, and other problems. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation.

See the Vet

Is your cat’s breath particularly foul? It’s time for a trip to the vet’s office for an examination. A variety of dental health issues could be to blame for rotten odors!

To make an appointment with your vet, call your pet clinic Rochester, NY today.

Paw Care Tips for Your Cat

Your cat’s paws are essential for her—they let her scratch, jump, run, climb, and much more! Keep your cat’s paws healthy throughout her life with these tips from a Plano, TX vet.

Paw Checks

Once a week, set aside some time to sit down with your cat and examine her paws. Look at each paw and take note of any abrasions, wounds, scratches, or anything else that looks unusual. Also check between the toes, where it’s easy for small items to get lodged. Let your veterinarian know if you find anything that warrants medical attention.

Seasonal Hazards

There are a variety of things outdoors that can cause harm all year round. In the summer, blistering asphalt surfaces like parking lots and driveways can burn a pet’s paw pads. Road salt and chemical ice-melt products can prove dangerous in the wintertime. That’s why it’s best not to let your cat venture outdoors!

Scratching Post

Scratching posts are essential for cats. They not only provide your cat with an outlet for her natural scratching instincts, they help to dull the claws!

Need help with your cat’s care routine? We’re here for you. Schedule an appointment with your pet clinic Plano, TX.

Keeping Your Cat’s Dental Health in Order

Dental health is important for nearly all pets, your cat included. If left unchecked, dental problems can start affecting more than just your cat’s mouth! Here, your veterinarian Raleigh, NC offers a few quick tips on keeping your cat’s oral health in good shape.

Proper Diet and Fresh Water

One of the easiest things you can do at home to maintain your cat’s dental health is to feed them a high-quality diet, made specifically for their age, breed, and weight, and provide them with a large dish of cool, fresh water at all times. Proper nutrition and plenty of water help keep the teeth and gums strong and clean!

Dental Chews

Cats don’t typically chew on rubber toys like dogs do, so dental treats are a good choice for helping to scrape away some of the excess plaque around kitty’s teeth and gums. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation on such a product.

Professional Cleanings

Of course, there’s no substitute for a professional dental cleaning at your veterinarian’s office. This will get at the nooks and crannies in your cat’s mouth that really need a deep clean! To schedule an appointment, call your pet clinic Raleigh, NC today.

Dog and Cat Pest Control

There are a variety of pesky pests out there just waiting to latch on to our animal companions and start wreaking havoc. That’s why it’s important to prevent the problem initially! Below, learn more about the most common types of pet pests from a vet Cherry Hill, NJ.

Fleas

Fleas can quickly cause a serious infestation and lead to symptoms like balding, skin infection, and more. They can also infest your family’s bedding and clothing! Keep your pet on a year-round flea medication to ward these pesky critters off.

Ticks

Ticks carry dangerous diseases like Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, erlichiosis, and many others. Fortunately, flea and tick preventatives are most often bundled together. Ask your vet for a high-quality flea-and-tick medication that will suit your pet’s needs and keep them pest-free.

Worms

Heartworms, roundworms, flatworms, hookworms… there are many types of worms that can infest your pet and start causing serious health problems. A heartworm preventative will keep almost all of them at bay—contact your vet right away if your dog or cat isn’t already on a heartworm preventative.

Want more advice on keeping your pet pest-free? Give your animal hospital Cherry Hill, NJ a call today.

What Your Cat’s Tail Movements Mean

Did you know that cats use their tails as a primary mode of communication, in addition to vocalization? You can try and determine what your cat is thinking just by looking at her tail! Learn more here from a veterinarian Marietta, GA.

The Hoisted Tail

Often, you’ll see your cat’s tail hoisted straight up in the air. This typically means that your cat is feeling confident and self-assured. Give your cat a bit of love; she’s likely to be very friendly when the tail is held like this.

The Puffed Tail

Of course, you probably know what a puffed tail means. It’s usually accompanied with wide eyes and a hiss; this is your cat’s way of looking bigger and scarier in order to ward off a perceived threat.

The Tail Wrap

Have you ever seen your cat wrap her tail gently around your leg, or perhaps around another pet in the house? This is your cat’s way of showing affection, much like we would wrap an arm around a loved one.

Not all cats are the same, of course! Contact your vets Marietta, GA directly for more insight into your cat’s unique behavior and care needs. We’re here to help!

Get Your Cat to Use Her Scratching Post

Is your feline friend scratching up your furniture and carpets? An important part of the solution is to give her an appropriate scratching surface: a scratching post! Use these tips from a veterinarian Livonia, MI to get your cat to use her post.

Training

Every time that your cat scratches something that you don’t want her to, tell her “no” in a firm voice and move her physically to the scratching post. Do this enough, and your cat will get the hint: scratching on the board is what she wants to do!

Placement

Always make sure your cat’s scratching post is placed in an area where she spends time frequently. It won’t do to have the scratching post near the litter box, where your cat doesn’t spend a lot of time. In most homes, a living room or family room works best.

Bribery

Try sprinkling raw catnip, available at most pet supply shops and certain retail stores, on your cat’s scratching post. This is a great way to entice many of our feline friends into using their post properly!

Need help with your cat’s scratching problem? We’re here for you. Schedule an appointment to see your animal hospital Livonia, MI.

Toxic Human Foods for Cats

There are plenty of human foods that aren’t safe for pets. The trick is having your cat avoid harmful substances so that they stay healthy! Learn about three common offenders below from your Rochester, NY veterinarian.

Chocolate

Chocolate, as you probably know, is a dangerous poison for our feline friends. All types of chocolate contain chemicals like caffeine and theobromine that don’t agree with animals. Never leave chocolate or foods that contain chocolate on countertops or the table, where your cat might be able to get at it.

Onions

Did you know that onions, as well as related foods like garlic, chives, and shallots, are highly toxic to cats? While it’s not likely that your cat will go out of their way to ingest onions, it’s not worth the risk. Put these foods in places where even the craftiest of cats won’t have access.

Alcohol

Alcohol affects cats just like it affects us! There’s a big difference, though: it only takes very small amounts to do serious harm to your feline friend. Never leave drinks unattended, and make sure cats can’t sneak a sip; this goes for beer, liquor, wine, and champagne.

Call your vet clinic Rochester, NY to learn more.

Your Kitten’s Diet

Are you the new owner of a kitten? Thinking of adopting a young cat in the near future? Diet is one of the most important parts of your new pet’s proper growth. Here, your Plano, TX veterinarian provides some guidelines.

Newborns

Newborn kittens should still be with their mother to receive milk, but if they’re not, a synthetic milk substitute will need to be given. These are widely available at pet stores and some retail outlets; ask your vet for a recommendation.

After a few weeks, you’ll be able to start combining milk with dry or wet kitten food. Ask your vet for precise details.

3-6 Months of Age

At this stage, your kitten should be eating kitten formula food at all times. Talk to your vet to find out about the proper portion size. Keep in mind that your kitten will probably eat whatever food type you choose at this stage—wet or dry—for the rest of their life!

6 Months and Older

Have your kitten continue eating kitten food until about a year of age. Then, you will gradually start transitioning them to an adult food.

For more information on kitten nutrition, call your vet clinic Plano, TX.

All About Catnip

We’ve all heard of catnip. How much do you know, though, about your feline friends’ preferred plant? Below, your Indianapolis, IN veterinarian answers your most frequently asked questions.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is an herb, classified in the same plant grouping as mint. It grows in the wild, although the catnip you’ll purchase in a pet store is a dried and processed version which looks similar to dried oregano or basil flakes. Catnip can also be infused into sprays or included in cat toys.

Why Does it Affect Cats?

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical called nepetalactone. It’s this substance that causes a reaction in your cat’s brain. The reaction is completely safe, and the effects will most likely wear off in just a minute or two.

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Have you tried out catnip on your cat to no avail? There’s no need to worry; your cat is fine. If a cat doesn’t possess a certain gene, inherited from their parents, they won’t respond to catnip at all!

Does your feline friend need vaccinations or a veterinary examination? We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs. Call your vet clinic Indianapolis, IN.

Why Your Cat Has Shunned Her Litterbox

Has your cat been eliminating outside of her litterbox? It’s not uncommon for our feline friends to develop an aversion to their bathroom! Below, your Colorado Springs, CO vet tells you about some common reasons this may be happening and how to fix them.

Placement

Where your cat’s bathroom is located is very important. Put it in a quiet, out-of-the-way place where Fluffy won’t be disturbed. No one wants to do their business in a crowded, noisy area!

Cleanliness

Who wants to use a dirty bathroom? Not your cat, that’s for sure! Make sure you scoop out your cat’s litterbox on a regular basis to remove waste, and change the litter out entirely every week to make sure things stay fresh and clean. Cats may avoid their litterbox entirely if it’s not up to their standards!

Negative Conditioning

If your cat was startled while using her box earlier in life, she might be afraid to use it now. Talk to your veterinary professional or an animal behaviorist if you think your cat is having this problem.

Want more advice on your cat’s bathroom habits or behavior? Don’t hesitate to call your vet Colorado Springs, CO. We’re here for you!