Category Archives: Dogs Care

How to Choose the Right Dog Carrier

Are you the new owner of a dog? Planning on adding a canine companion to your home soon? You’ll need a carrier for transport! Read on as your Plano, TX vet advises you on choosing the right one.

Size

Of course, the first consideration you’ll need to make is one of size. Your dog should have enough room to comfortably stand and maneuver in the crate, but not enough room that he could be tossed around too easily. Keep in mind that your dog may grow larger than he is now.

Security

Make sure your dog’s carrier has a secure, sturdy latch on the front door so that it can’t accidentally pop open, allowing your dog to escape. You should also choose a cage with vent holes small enough to prevent your dog from reaching out of the front or sides.

Safety

Check inside your dog’s crate for any sharp edges—you don’t want your dog to cut themselves on a piece of sharp plastic or metal. It may be prudent to put a soft blanket along the bottom of your pooch’s carrier as well.

Want help choosing the right carrier for your dog? Contact your animal hospital Plano, TX.

How to Keep Your Dog’s Food Fresh

Let’s face it—dog food isn’t cheap! Keeping your dog’s food as fresh as possible helps it to last longer, ultimately saving you money. Below, your Glendale, AZ vet offers a few quick tips.

General Tips

The enemies of your dog’s food are moisture, light, and heat. If Fido’s food is overexposed to these factors, it may go bad. This is why it’s always best to store your dog’s food in a cool, dry, relatively dark spot. It’s the best way to avoid your dog’s food going to waste!

Dry Food

Try storing your dog’s dry food in an airtight container, or in the same packaging it came it. This is a good way to ensure that Fido’s kibble doesn’t become stale. Ask your vet about other great ways to make sure that your dog’s dry food stays fresh.

Wet Food

If unopened, cans of wet dog food can stay good for a long time, especially if they’re stored in a cool, dry, dark place. Once opened, the wet food should stay good in your refrigerator for about a week.

Want even more advice on keeping your dog’s food fresh? Call your animal hospital Glendale, AZ today for further tips.

Dealing With Your Dog’s Excess Shedding

Although most dogs shed, it’s important to take note when your canine companion seems to be losing hair excessively. If your dog is shedding too much, it’s time to act! Learn what to do in this article from a Sugar Land, TX vet.

Grooming Tips

Brushing your dog frequently traps loose fur in the brush itself, preventing it from winding up all over your home. The occasional bath is another good way clean up your dog and reduces shedding. A simple grooming routine like this works well for most dogs to keep shedding at a minimum!

Diet Change

Did you know that what your dog eats has a lot to do with his coat quality? If Fido doesn’t receive the proper vitamins and minerals from the diet, the fur and skin will suffer. Ask your vet to recommend a high-quality, nutritionally balanced diet so that your dog’s coat quality stays top-notch.

See the Vet

If you can’t seem to get your dog’s shedding under control, pay a visit to your vet’s office. It’s possible that medical issues are to blame!

Call your pet clinic Sugar Land, TX if your animal friend needs a veterinary checkup. We’re always here to help!

Tricking Your Dog Into Taking a Pill

It’s safe to say that your dog will have to take a pill at some point. If you’ve ever tried giving Fido a pill, you probably know that it’s not as easy as it seems! Use these tricks from an Indianapolis, IN veterinarian to get your dog to swallow his pill medication.

Tossing

Does your dog like catching treats in mid-air? Gather together a few dog treats in one hand and your dog’s pill in the other. Toss a couple of treats, then the pill, then another treat. With any luck, your dog won’t notice that one of his “treats” was actually medicine!

Hiding

It’s often easiest to try hiding your dog’s pill inside his normal dog food. You can also press it into the center of a soft dog treat or roll it up in some lean deli meat. Always check with your veterinarian first, though, as some medications aren’t meant to be taken with food.

Crushing

Some pills can be crushed up and sprinkled over or stirred into your dog’s meals. Check with your veterinarian first—you don’t want to put your dog at risk by tampering with his medicine.

Call your pet clinic Indianapolis, IN for more information.

Helping Your Dog Deal With Storm Anxiety

Many of our canine companions are not fond of thunderstorms. Dogs can easily be frightened by the earth-shattering booms, and it’s even possible that dogs are stressed out by changes in air pressure or static electricity levels. Here, your vet Frisco, TX offers advice on helping your dog cope.

Safe Space

If you have a basement room where the storm may be a bit quieter, set up a safe zone there with a plush pet bed, a few soft blankets, and your dog’s favorite toys. Lead your pet here when storms roll through and stay with Fido until the bad weather has passed.

Desensitization

Desensitization involves playing a recording of a thunderstorm at a low volume, then gradually turning up the volume over time to allow your dog to get acclimated to the noise. Ask your veterinarian for advice before trying a desensitization regimen on your pet.

See Your Vet

For dogs with severe anxiety, medications can be prescribed to help manage the condition and keep your dog calm. If you think your dog might benefit from medicine, contact your veterinarian today.

Want to know more about storm anxiety and your dog? Contact your veterinary clinic Frisco, TX today.

Traveling by Car with Your Dog

At some point or another, you’ll undoubtedly have to transport your dog in the car. This can be easier said than done! Use your Scottsdale, AZ vet’s tips and tricks to make your dog’s car ride go smoothly.

Car Anxiety

Many dogs are anxious when it comes to the car. Try desensitizing your pet by allowing them to explore the car when it’s simply sitting in the driveway without the engine running. Eventually, you can start going on short drives. Offer your dog treats when you get home so that he realizes car rides aren’t always bad.

Carsickness

Don’t feed your dog for several hours before the car ride. You can try cracking a window or playing music at a low volume; these methods help some dogs to remain calm during car rides.

Travel Tips

Leave plenty of room between other cars so that you have plenty of space to stop without braking hard. On longer drives, be sure to take a pit stop every hour or so to allow Fido to use the bathroom.

Does your dog need a veterinary examination, vaccinations, or pest-control medicines? Make an appointment at your animal hospital Scottsdale, AZ today. We’re here to help!

Beach Safety Tips for Your Dog

Many of our canine companions love going to the beach, and it’s a lot of fun to watch your dog frolic around in the sand and surf. Just make sure they stay safe! Use these tips from a vet Ellicott City, MD to do just that:

Hydration and Shade

Bring along a beach umbrella to provide shade for your dog if you’re visiting the beach during the hottest parts of the day. It’s also important to bring a large thermos of cool, fresh water just for your dog and offer him sips from it regularly—never let your dog consume salty ocean water!

Water Safety

If your dog ventures into the shallows, head in behind him; it’s always safest to lend a supportive hand. Dogs may not be used to ocean currents and tides, and you don’t want to let your dog get too far out.

A Final Rinse

After leaving the beach, be sure to give your dog’s coat a thorough rinse with fresh water. This removes sand and salt from the coat, preventing your dog from experiencing dry skin and irritation.

Want more tips for taking your dog to the beach? Call your veterinarian Ellicott City, MD.

Helping Your Cat and Dog Get Along

Our canine companions and our feline friends have certainly had their battles over the years. If you own both a dog and a cat in the same household, it can be difficult to help them get along! Use these tips from a veterinarian Aurora, CO to help keep the peace.

Proper Introduction

It’s always best if you introduce your pets properly from the get-go. The key is to do so slowly; don’t force your pets together all at once. Keep your dog on a leash when introducing him to your cat so there are no accidents. Remember: it may take days, weeks, or even longer until the two are acclimated to one another.

Separate Areas

Make sure your cat’s litter box, food dishes, and napping spots are far away from Fido’s areas. You don’t want to run into any territorial behavior between your two pets. Try using dog gates or even baby gates to separate different areas of the house for each pet.

See the Pros

If you can’t get your dog and cat to make nice and you’re worried about your pets’ quality of life, it’s time to seek professional help. Call your animal hospital Aurora, CO today!

Tending to Your Dog’s Paws

Your dog needs his paws for a wide variety of things—waking, running, digging, and scratching himself, to name a few. Keep these essential body parts healthy with these care tips from your veterinarians Lafayette, LA.

Nail Trims

When a dog’s nails become too long and sharp, they can fracture painfully and even start to affect how your dog walks. They can also get snagged in carpets and rugs. Trim your dog’s nails carefully with a canine-specific clipper, or have your vet take care of nail trims for you.

Paw Checks

Once a week or so, sit down with your dog and examine each of the four paws. Check for any obvious wounds or abrasions, and look for any small items—burrs, pebbles, twigs, bits of metal or plastic—stuck in between the toes. Let your vet know if you find something that warrants concern.

Paw Pad Burns

On extremely hot days, it’s possible for dogs to burn the paw pads significantly on scorching asphalt surfaces. Whenever possible, avoid parking lots and driveways, choosing to walk Fido on cooler grass or concrete instead.

Want more advice on caring for your dog’s paws? Give your veterinary clinic Lafayette, LA a call.

Pest Preventatives for Your Dog

It’s a safe bet your dog spends plenty of time outdoors. Beware—there is a whole host of tiny critters waiting to cause harm to your canine companion! The trick is keeping your dog on the proper preventative medications. Here, your vet Plano, TX tells you more.

Worms

Heartworms, roundworms, flatworms, and much more pose a threat to your dog as soon as he steps outside. These pests can cause dangerous—and even deadly—infestations if not treated. It’s easiest to avoid them entirely with a proper worm preventative!

Fleas

Fleas cause pesky infestations that will cause your dog to scratch incessantly, and fleas can jump to other pets and even humans, causing serious problems in your home. Talk to your vet about getting your dog set up with a flea preventative that will work all year-round.

Ticks

Ticks can transmit dangerous diseases like Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Why not avoid the trouble before it can begin? Get your dog on a tick preventative (often, these are combined with flea preventatives) to ensure that Fido isn’t in any danger.

For more information on preventatives for your dog, contact your animal hospital Plano, TX. We’re here for you!