Category Archives: Dogs Care

Traveling by Car with Your Dog

At some point or another, you’ll undoubtedly have to transport your dog in the car. This can be easier said than done! Use your Scottsdale, AZ vet’s tips and tricks to make your dog’s car ride go smoothly.

Car Anxiety

Many dogs are anxious when it comes to the car. Try desensitizing your pet by allowing them to explore the car when it’s simply sitting in the driveway without the engine running. Eventually, you can start going on short drives. Offer your dog treats when you get home so that he realizes car rides aren’t always bad.

Carsickness

Don’t feed your dog for several hours before the car ride. You can try cracking a window or playing music at a low volume; these methods help some dogs to remain calm during car rides.

Travel Tips

Leave plenty of room between other cars so that you have plenty of space to stop without braking hard. On longer drives, be sure to take a pit stop every hour or so to allow Fido to use the bathroom.

Does your dog need a veterinary examination, vaccinations, or pest-control medicines? Make an appointment at your animal hospital Scottsdale, AZ today. We’re here to help!

Beach Safety Tips for Your Dog

Many of our canine companions love going to the beach, and it’s a lot of fun to watch your dog frolic around in the sand and surf. Just make sure they stay safe! Use these tips from a vet Ellicott City, MD to do just that:

Hydration and Shade

Bring along a beach umbrella to provide shade for your dog if you’re visiting the beach during the hottest parts of the day. It’s also important to bring a large thermos of cool, fresh water just for your dog and offer him sips from it regularly—never let your dog consume salty ocean water!

Water Safety

If your dog ventures into the shallows, head in behind him; it’s always safest to lend a supportive hand. Dogs may not be used to ocean currents and tides, and you don’t want to let your dog get too far out.

A Final Rinse

After leaving the beach, be sure to give your dog’s coat a thorough rinse with fresh water. This removes sand and salt from the coat, preventing your dog from experiencing dry skin and irritation.

Want more tips for taking your dog to the beach? Call your veterinarian Ellicott City, MD.

Helping Your Cat and Dog Get Along

Our canine companions and our feline friends have certainly had their battles over the years. If you own both a dog and a cat in the same household, it can be difficult to help them get along! Use these tips from a veterinarian Aurora, CO to help keep the peace.

Proper Introduction

It’s always best if you introduce your pets properly from the get-go. The key is to do so slowly; don’t force your pets together all at once. Keep your dog on a leash when introducing him to your cat so there are no accidents. Remember: it may take days, weeks, or even longer until the two are acclimated to one another.

Separate Areas

Make sure your cat’s litter box, food dishes, and napping spots are far away from Fido’s areas. You don’t want to run into any territorial behavior between your two pets. Try using dog gates or even baby gates to separate different areas of the house for each pet.

See the Pros

If you can’t get your dog and cat to make nice and you’re worried about your pets’ quality of life, it’s time to seek professional help. Call your animal hospital Aurora, CO today!

Tending to Your Dog’s Paws

Your dog needs his paws for a wide variety of things—waking, running, digging, and scratching himself, to name a few. Keep these essential body parts healthy with these care tips from your veterinarians Lafayette, LA.

Nail Trims

When a dog’s nails become too long and sharp, they can fracture painfully and even start to affect how your dog walks. They can also get snagged in carpets and rugs. Trim your dog’s nails carefully with a canine-specific clipper, or have your vet take care of nail trims for you.

Paw Checks

Once a week or so, sit down with your dog and examine each of the four paws. Check for any obvious wounds or abrasions, and look for any small items—burrs, pebbles, twigs, bits of metal or plastic—stuck in between the toes. Let your vet know if you find something that warrants concern.

Paw Pad Burns

On extremely hot days, it’s possible for dogs to burn the paw pads significantly on scorching asphalt surfaces. Whenever possible, avoid parking lots and driveways, choosing to walk Fido on cooler grass or concrete instead.

Want more advice on caring for your dog’s paws? Give your veterinary clinic Lafayette, LA a call.

Pest Preventatives for Your Dog

It’s a safe bet your dog spends plenty of time outdoors. Beware—there is a whole host of tiny critters waiting to cause harm to your canine companion! The trick is keeping your dog on the proper preventative medications. Here, your vet Plano, TX tells you more.

Worms

Heartworms, roundworms, flatworms, and much more pose a threat to your dog as soon as he steps outside. These pests can cause dangerous—and even deadly—infestations if not treated. It’s easiest to avoid them entirely with a proper worm preventative!

Fleas

Fleas cause pesky infestations that will cause your dog to scratch incessantly, and fleas can jump to other pets and even humans, causing serious problems in your home. Talk to your vet about getting your dog set up with a flea preventative that will work all year-round.

Ticks

Ticks can transmit dangerous diseases like Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Why not avoid the trouble before it can begin? Get your dog on a tick preventative (often, these are combined with flea preventatives) to ensure that Fido isn’t in any danger.

For more information on preventatives for your dog, contact your animal hospital Plano, TX. We’re here for you!

Road Trip Safety Tips for Dogs

Does your dog enjoy road trips? It’s definitely a lot of fun to include your canine companion if you’re taking a family vacation or day trip. Just be sure to keep Fido’s well-being in mind! Learn more below from a vet Scottsdale, AZ.

Use the Carriera

It’s always best to keep your dog in his carrier for car rides, buckling it in with seatbelts or bungee cords. This is the best way to keep your dog safe and secure for the duration of your trip. If you’d like a recommendation on the right carrier for your dog, consult your veterinarian.

Car Anxiety Tips

Many dogs are anxious when it comes to riding in the car. Try desensitizing your canine companion by going on very short drives around your neighborhood on a regular basis, offering your dog treats and toys during the journey. While on your trip, be sure to take frequent stops to let Fido out for a bathroom break.

Check Your Destination

Always make sure your dog is welcome at your destination before leaving home—you don’t want to arrive at a hotel to find out that dogs aren’t allowed!

Ask your veterinarian Scottsdale, AZ for more safety tips.

How to Improve Your Dog’s Coat of Fur

Is your pooch’s coat looking a little less-than-stellar recently? It’s not uncommon for our dogs’ coats to become a bit dull and dry now and then. Use these tips from a veterinarian Fort Collins, CO to improve your dog’s coat of fur:

Grooming

Brush your dog daily; this removes loose fur from the coat and spreads natural skin oils through the hair to moisturize it. It’s a great way to cut down on shedding!

Bathing your dog occasionally—using a canine-formulated shampoo at all times—is another good way to keep things fresh. Don’t overdo it, though, as over-bathing can dry out your dog’s skin further.

Diet

What your dog eats has a lot to do with his skin and fur health. Without the right vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids, your dog’s fur might become dry and coarse! Ask your vet to recommend a great diet choice for your pooch’s nutritional needs.

Veterinary Visit

If your dog’s coat is particularly dry and dull, or you’ve suddenly seen a drastic increase in shedding or bald patches, visit your vet. Medical issues could be to blame!

Call your animal hospital Fort Collins, CO today for more information on your dog’s grooming needs.

What to Do if Your Dog Sheds Too Much

Does your canine companion leave excessive amounts of fur all over the house? While shedding is simply a natural part of life for most dogs, too much can be a problem! Here, your Colorado Springs, CO veterinarian tells you what to do.

Help With Grooming

You’ll be surprised at the difference that daily brushing can make when it comes to shedding. Not only does brushing your animal friend help trap loose and dead fur in the brush itself, preventing it from winding up on your carpets and floors, it spreads essential skin oils through the coat. This moisturizes the fur naturally to cut back on shedding at the get-go.

Diet Change

If your dog doesn’t receive the proper nutrients from food, his skin health will suffer and shedding may increase. Ask your veterinarian if your pooch’s current diet is up to par—if it’s not, it might be time for a change.

See Your Veterinarian

If you still can’t seem to get your dog’s excessive shedding under control, make an appointment to have your dog examined at the vet’s office. Medical issues could be to blame!

For more information on your dog’s grooming needs, call your veterinarians Colorado Springs, CO.

Electing a Leash for Your Dog

Are you new to dog ownership? It can be difficult to know what sort of leash to select when you’re visiting the pet store. Below, your Savannah, GA veterinarian gives you a crash course:

The Standard Leash

Most dogs will be just fine with a standard leash. These are typically about six feet long and are made of nylon or perhaps leather. They have a loop at one end, and a clasping mechanism at the other to attach to your dog’s collar.

Retractable Leashes

Retractable leashes are currently quite popular; they feature a spring-loaded handle, allowing your dog to move away from you as they please until you press a button, stopping the leash from retracting further. Just be careful not to let your dog get too far away from you!

Training Leashes

Training leashes may be extra short, long, or made of a particular material to help your dog learn certain commands or maneuvers. Generally speaking, it’s not necessary to use a training leash with your dog unless directed to do so by your veterinarian or a dog-training professional.

Would you like a recommendation on a good leash for your dog’s needs? Talk to your vet Savannah, GA today.

Giving Your Dog Pill Medication

If you own a dog, it’s a safe bet that you’ll have to give them a pill at some point. That can be much easier said than done! Your Plano, TX veterinarian gives you a few tips below:

Hide in Food

Ask your veterinarian if your dog’s pill is safe to be given with food. If it is, you can try hiding it in the center of a glob of wet dog food, a soft dog treat, or in a roll of deli meat. With any luck, your dog will gobble up the tasty morsel without even realizing there was medication inside!

Crushing

In some cases, you can crush your dog’s pill up and sprinkle it over food. Make sure to ask your veterinarian first, though—crushing may render some medications ineffective, or it could introduce the medication to your dog’s system too quickly.

Manual Administration

If the above methods don’t work, you will have to give your dog the pill manually. Pry open your dog’s jaws with one hand, then place the pill far back in the mouth. Close the jaws and stroke the throat to stimulate swallowing.

For help administering your dog’s pill, contact your animal hospital Plano, TX.