Category Archives: Pets Care

Keeping Your Pet Happy in Hot Weather

When the temperatures soar, it’s important that you keep your pet’s health and happiness in mind. After all, they’re wearing a fur coat that they can’t take off! Use these tips from a veterinarian Marietta, GA to keep your dog or cat safe and sound:

Hydration

Whether your pet is spending time indoors or outside, make sure they have a large dish of cool, fresh water to drink from at all times. This will keep your pet properly hydrated all day. Check the bowl periodically, and refresh or refill it as necessary to ensure that your four-legged companion stays comfortable.

Indoor Time

It’s never a good idea to leave your pet outdoors for long periods of time during the summer months. This is inviting deadly dehydration, heat stroke, and worse! Bring your pet back indoors frequently, where they’ll be cool in the air-conditioning. Try exercising them in the cooler morning or evening hours, when it’s not as hot outside.

Paw Care Tips

When walking your pet outdoors, do your best not to let them linger on asphalt surfaces like driveways and parking lots. These surfaces get extremely hot in the summer!

For more tips, contact your vet clinic Marietta, GA.

Everything You Need to Know About Catnip

It’s our cats’ favorite plant. Catnip is widely available and provides a great indulgence for many of our feline friends. How much do you really know about this fascinating aspect of our cats’ lives? Learn about the basics of catnip from an Oshawa, ON veterinarian:

What is Catnip?

Catnip is an herb; it grows in the wild in many parts of North America, and the wild plant is dried and processed to create the “raw” catnip that you’ll find in a pet store. The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical substance, nepetalactone, that causes the reactions you’ll see in your cat.

Is Catnip Safe?

Yes, catnip is perfectly safe—your cat cannot overdose or become addicted to it. The effects will usually wear off after only a few short moments, and you can feel free to give your cat catnip as often as you’d like.

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Is your cat not reacting when you give them catnip? Don’t worry—they’re perfectly healthy! If cats don’t possess a particular gene, inherited from their parents, they won’t feel catnip’s effects at all.

To learn more about catnip and your feline friend’s behavior, call your veterinary clinic Oshawa, ON.

Defeating Pet Odors in Your Home or Apartment

Let’s face it—after a while, our pets can start to leave a bit of an odor around our homes. Why not take some simple steps to keep your living space smelling great? Here, your vet Ashburn, VA tells you how to defeat pet odors at home:

Grooming

You’ll be surprised at what a simple grooming regimen can do for your pet’s odor control. Brush your pet every day to remove loose hair, get rid of grime, and cut back on shedding. The occasional bath is also a great way to keep your pet smelling fresh—always use a pet-specific shampoo, and don’t bathe too frequently or you’ll dry out the coat.

Hot Spots

For cat owners, clean the litterbox daily. For both dogs and cats, pet beds can be a hot-spot source of pet odors. Don’t hesitate to toss your pet’s bed into the washing machine every now and again to keep things fresh.

Odor Neutralizers

Air fresheners mask smells, letting them return over time. Odor neutralizer products combat the enzymes that cause odors in the first place! Ask your vet for a recommendation.

To learn more about your pet’s grooming needs, contact your animal hospital Ashburn, VA today.

Why Spay and Neuter?

Spaying or neutering your pet is one of the best things you can do early on in your animal companion’s life for their health and well-being. It’s about much more than just preventing unplanned litters, though! Learn more here from a vet in Los Gatos, CA.

Health Benefits

Spaying and neutering offers a variety of important health benefits. The risk of genital cancers, for one, is virtually eliminated. Other cancer types—breast, prostate, and more—are also less likely to afflict a pet who has had the procedure performed. Even UTIs and other common ailments aren’t as common.

Improved Behavior

Pets who have been spayed or neutered behave far better than those who haven’t. While the procedure doesn’t cure bad behavior, things like aggression, house soiling, loud vocalizations, problem digging, scratching, chewing, and escape attempts are greatly reduced in severity.

The Broader Benefit

There is a broader benefit to spaying and neutering: it helps control the homeless pet population, meaning that less animals have to be euthanized. Don’t contribute to the problem by allowing your pet to breed unchecked!

Does your pet need the spaying or neutering procedure performed? We’re here for you. Contact your veterinary clinic Los Gatos, CA.

Defeating Pet Odors

Like it or not, pets can sometimes introduce less-than-pleasant smells into our homes. You’ll want to take action to return your home to maximum freshness! Here are a few tips from a veterinarian Sugar Land, TX.

Grooming Tips

You’ll be surprised at what a difference regular grooming can make. Brush your pet daily; this removes loose and dead fur to keep it from falling all over your home. It also spreads skin oils through the coat to moisturize it and reduce shedding. The occasional bath—using a canine- or feline-formulated shampoo!—can also help.

Odor Neutralizers

Pick up odor neutralizer products at your local pet supply store. These will work far better than air fresheners or household cleaners, which may not make a dent in the enzymes that cause pet odors at their root.

See the Vet

If your pet is especially smelly, or if they’ve seemingly developed a pungent odor out of nowhere, it’s time to see the vet. Health issues—skin infection, parasitic infestation, and more—could be to blame! You’ll want to have your pet examined as soon as possible.

For more advice on combating pet odors, contact your vet Sugar Land, TX.

How to Tell if Your Bird Isn’t Feeling Well

Are you the proud owner of a feathered companion? It’s up to you to take notice when your bird isn’t feeling their best. Below, your vet Ellicott City, MD tells you about a few common signs of illness in birds so that you can take quick action.

Cere Signs

Your bird’s cere is essentially their nose; it’s the area above the beak where the nostrils are found. If you see discharge coming from this area, or notice dried crusts around the nostrils, it’s time to act. This could be a sign of respiratory issues, infection, and more.

Loss of Appetite

Is your bird giving the cold shoulder to his food? It’s safe to say that a loss of appetite isn’t a good sign. If your bird seems to be shunning his food for longer than a day or two, it’s worth a call to the vet’s office. Your pet might be suffering from disease, infection, or injury.

Ruffled Feathers

Although birds ruffle their feathers occasionally, they don’t typically keep them that way. Birds who have left the feathers ruffled for 24 hours or longer should be examined by your veterinarian!

Schedule an appointment with your pet clinic Ellicott City, MD.

Animal Adoption Myths

Are you considering adopting a pet in the near future? It’s important that you don’t believe everything you hear when it comes to adoption. Below, a Savannah, GA vet sets the record straight on a few common myths.

Shelter Pets Aren’t Well-Behaved

Some make the mistake of thinking that a pet wouldn’t find themselves in a shelter at all if they were a well-behaved animal. This couldn’t be further from the truth—most shelter pets are wonderfully mannered and came to a shelter for a different reason, like abandonment or uncontrolled breeding.

Shelter Pets Are Old

There are pets of every age—puppies and kittens, middle-aged companions, and senior pets—to be found in animal shelters. They’re not all old, unwanted pets! If you’re looking for a younger companion, take a tour through your local shelters.

Shelter Pets Are Expensive

Shelter pets are in fact far less expensive on average than purchasing directly from a pet store or breeder. They also likely already have vaccinations, are spayed or neutered, and may even have a microchip—this saves you plenty on initial costs!

Want to know more about adoption? Does your new companion need veterinary care? Call your vet clinic Savannah, GA.

How to Get Rid of Pet Odors

Let’s face the facts—pets can be a little smelly sometimes. If your home is starting to smell a little too much like your dog or cat, it’s time to change things! Here, your Cy-Fair vet offers a few expert tips.

Grooming

Brush your pet on a daily basis. You’ll be amazed at the difference you’ll see! Brushing helps control odors by getting rid of grime and loose hair. It also spreads essential skin oils through the coat to moisturize hair naturally. The occasional bath, always using a pet-formulated shampoo, is another great way to minimize smells.

Odor Neutralizers

Air fresheners mask over smells, letting them return once the scent of the product has worn off. Odor neutralizers are different—they combat the enzymes that cause odors at the root. Ask your vet for a recommendation, and browse the selection at your local pet supply shop.

Visit the Vet

Did you know that a variety of medical issues—skin infection, parasitic infestation, and more—can cause your pet to smell? If you can’t seem to correct your pet’s bad odor, it is time to see the vet!

For more information on pet odor control, contact your veterinarian Cy-Fair for help.

Onion Toxicity and Your Pet

Did you know that onions are a dangerous pet toxin? Our canine friends are the most likely to be harmed by onions, but that may be due to their indiscriminate tastes. Learn more about onion toxicity and your pet from an Aurora, CO veterinarian:

Why Are Onions Poisonous?

Onions, as well as related foods in the allium family like garlic, chives, scallions, and shallots, contain sulfur compounds that don’t agree with our animal companions. If your pet ingests an onion, symptoms like lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and worse may occur! In addition, symptoms may be delayed by hours or even days after initial ingestion.

What if My Pet Eats an Onion?

If you know or suspect that your pet has eaten an onion or related food, rush them to the nearest veterinary emergency room for treatment. The stomach may need to be flushed, or activated charcoal may be given to slow the toxin’s absorption. Your pet might need supportive measures like fluid therapy during recovery.

How Can I Prevent Poisoning?

Prevent onion poisoning by storing onions and similar foods in the cabinets or refrigerator where they belong. This way, pets don’t have access!

Call your vets Aurora, CO for more information.

Signs of Dental Trouble in Dogs and Cats

Dental trouble is rather common amongst our domesticated pets. One in ten pets will deal with a dental issue at one point or another! To learn about some of the signs of dental health issues, read on as your Lafayette, LA vet elaborates.

Loss of Appetite

Have you noticed that your pet isn’t eating the way they used to? Perhaps they’ve shunned their food dish altogether. This could be a sign of dental trouble, as well as an indication of a whole host of other conditions. It’s time to see your vet!

Behavioral Changes

Is your pet acting out aggressively when he or she is usually docile and friendly? Does it seem as though they’re shying away from any physical contact? Pain in the mouth could be the root cause. It’s worth a call to the vet’s office to make sure your pet doesn’t need treatment.

Rotten Breath

While your pet’s breath isn’t likely to smell wonderful, it also shouldn’t smell rotten. This could be a sign of rotting teeth or periodontitis (dental disease). Don’t delay—make an appointment at your vet’s office right away to have your pet examined.

For further advice, contact your pet clinic Lafayette LA today.