Animal Adoption Myths

Are you considering adopting a pet in the near future? It’s important that you don’t believe everything you hear when it comes to adoption. Below, a Savannah, GA vet sets the record straight on a few common myths.

Shelter Pets Aren’t Well-Behaved

Some make the mistake of thinking that a pet wouldn’t find themselves in a shelter at all if they were a well-behaved animal. This couldn’t be further from the truth—most shelter pets are wonderfully mannered and came to a shelter for a different reason, like abandonment or uncontrolled breeding.

Shelter Pets Are Old

There are pets of every age—puppies and kittens, middle-aged companions, and senior pets—to be found in animal shelters. They’re not all old, unwanted pets! If you’re looking for a younger companion, take a tour through your local shelters.

Shelter Pets Are Expensive

Shelter pets are in fact far less expensive on average than purchasing directly from a pet store or breeder. They also likely already have vaccinations, are spayed or neutered, and may even have a microchip—this saves you plenty on initial costs!

Want to know more about adoption? Does your new companion need veterinary care? Call your vet clinic Savannah, GA.

Your Kitten’s Diet

Are you the new owner of a kitten? Thinking of adopting a young cat in the near future? Diet is one of the most important parts of your new pet’s proper growth. Here, your Plano, TX veterinarian provides some guidelines.


Newborn kittens should still be with their mother to receive milk, but if they’re not, a synthetic milk substitute will need to be given. These are widely available at pet stores and some retail outlets; ask your vet for a recommendation.

After a few weeks, you’ll be able to start combining milk with dry or wet kitten food. Ask your vet for precise details.

3-6 Months of Age

At this stage, your kitten should be eating kitten formula food at all times. Talk to your vet to find out about the proper portion size. Keep in mind that your kitten will probably eat whatever food type you choose at this stage—wet or dry—for the rest of their life!

6 Months and Older

Have your kitten continue eating kitten food until about a year of age. Then, you will gradually start transitioning them to an adult food.

For more information on kitten nutrition, call your vet clinic Plano, TX.

All About Catnip

We’ve all heard of catnip. How much do you know, though, about your feline friends’ preferred plant? Below, your Indianapolis, IN veterinarian answers your most frequently asked questions.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is an herb, classified in the same plant grouping as mint. It grows in the wild, although the catnip you’ll purchase in a pet store is a dried and processed version which looks similar to dried oregano or basil flakes. Catnip can also be infused into sprays or included in cat toys.

Why Does it Affect Cats?

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical called nepetalactone. It’s this substance that causes a reaction in your cat’s brain. The reaction is completely safe, and the effects will most likely wear off in just a minute or two.

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Have you tried out catnip on your cat to no avail? There’s no need to worry; your cat is fine. If a cat doesn’t possess a certain gene, inherited from their parents, they won’t respond to catnip at all!

Does your feline friend need vaccinations or a veterinary examination? We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs. Call your vet clinic Indianapolis, IN.

How to Improve Your Dog’s Coat Quality

How is your dog’s coat of fur looking recently? Our canine companions can occasionally use a little help in the grooming department! Here, your Moorpark, CA veterinarian tells you about three quick ways to improve Fido’s coat.


Run a brush through your dog’s coat on a daily basis. It will remove loose and dead fur from the coat and spread essential skin oils through the fur, moisturizing it naturally and cutting down on shedding. Ask your vet about the right brush and/or bristle type for your dog’s particular coat.


Bathe your dog occasionally to keep things fresh and clean; always use a canine-formulated shampoo. Also, make sure you don’t overdo bathing—if you bathe Fido too frequently, the skin will dry out and the fur will become coarse.

Diet Upgrade

Your dog’s diet and nutrition has a lot to do with his coat quality. If your pet doesn’t receive the right nutrients, the skin and fur will suffer! Consult your veterinarian about upgrading your dog to a premium, nutritionally balanced diet that is appropriate for his age, breed, and weight.

Do you want more tips on maintaining your dog’s coat? Contact your veterinary clinic Moorpark, CA veterinary clinic for help.

How to Get Rid of Pet Odors

Let’s face the facts—pets can be a little smelly sometimes. If your home is starting to smell a little too much like your dog or cat, it’s time to change things! Here, your Cy-Fair vet offers a few expert tips.


Brush your pet on a daily basis. You’ll be amazed at the difference you’ll see! Brushing helps control odors by getting rid of grime and loose hair. It also spreads essential skin oils through the coat to moisturize hair naturally. The occasional bath, always using a pet-formulated shampoo, is another great way to minimize smells.

Odor Neutralizers

Air fresheners mask over smells, letting them return once the scent of the product has worn off. Odor neutralizers are different—they combat the enzymes that cause odors at the root. Ask your vet for a recommendation, and browse the selection at your local pet supply shop.

Visit the Vet

Did you know that a variety of medical issues—skin infection, parasitic infestation, and more—can cause your pet to smell? If you can’t seem to correct your pet’s bad odor, it is time to see the vet!

For more information on pet odor control, contact your veterinarian Cy-Fair for help.

Onion Toxicity and Your Pet

Did you know that onions are a dangerous pet toxin? Our canine friends are the most likely to be harmed by onions, but that may be due to their indiscriminate tastes. Learn more about onion toxicity and your pet from an Aurora, CO veterinarian:

Why Are Onions Poisonous?

Onions, as well as related foods in the allium family like garlic, chives, scallions, and shallots, contain sulfur compounds that don’t agree with our animal companions. If your pet ingests an onion, symptoms like lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and worse may occur! In addition, symptoms may be delayed by hours or even days after initial ingestion.

What if My Pet Eats an Onion?

If you know or suspect that your pet has eaten an onion or related food, rush them to the nearest veterinary emergency room for treatment. The stomach may need to be flushed, or activated charcoal may be given to slow the toxin’s absorption. Your pet might need supportive measures like fluid therapy during recovery.

How Can I Prevent Poisoning?

Prevent onion poisoning by storing onions and similar foods in the cabinets or refrigerator where they belong. This way, pets don’t have access!

Call your vets Aurora, CO for more information.

Signs of Dental Trouble in Dogs and Cats

Dental trouble is rather common amongst our domesticated pets. One in ten pets will deal with a dental issue at one point or another! To learn about some of the signs of dental health issues, read on as your Lafayette, LA vet elaborates.

Loss of Appetite

Have you noticed that your pet isn’t eating the way they used to? Perhaps they’ve shunned their food dish altogether. This could be a sign of dental trouble, as well as an indication of a whole host of other conditions. It’s time to see your vet!

Behavioral Changes

Is your pet acting out aggressively when he or she is usually docile and friendly? Does it seem as though they’re shying away from any physical contact? Pain in the mouth could be the root cause. It’s worth a call to the vet’s office to make sure your pet doesn’t need treatment.

Rotten Breath

While your pet’s breath isn’t likely to smell wonderful, it also shouldn’t smell rotten. This could be a sign of rotting teeth or periodontitis (dental disease). Don’t delay—make an appointment at your vet’s office right away to have your pet examined.

For further advice, contact your pet clinic Lafayette LA today.

How to Choose the Right Dog Carrier

Are you the new owner of a dog? Planning on adding a canine companion to your home soon? You’ll need a carrier for transport! Read on as your Plano, TX vet advises you on choosing the right one.


Of course, the first consideration you’ll need to make is one of size. Your dog should have enough room to comfortably stand and maneuver in the crate, but not enough room that he could be tossed around too easily. Keep in mind that your dog may grow larger than he is now.


Make sure your dog’s carrier has a secure, sturdy latch on the front door so that it can’t accidentally pop open, allowing your dog to escape. You should also choose a cage with vent holes small enough to prevent your dog from reaching out of the front or sides.


Check inside your dog’s crate for any sharp edges—you don’t want your dog to cut themselves on a piece of sharp plastic or metal. It may be prudent to put a soft blanket along the bottom of your pooch’s carrier as well.

Want help choosing the right carrier for your dog? Contact your animal hospital Plano, TX.

Why Your Cat Has Shunned Her Litterbox

Has your cat been eliminating outside of her litterbox? It’s not uncommon for our feline friends to develop an aversion to their bathroom! Below, your Colorado Springs, CO vet tells you about some common reasons this may be happening and how to fix them.


Where your cat’s bathroom is located is very important. Put it in a quiet, out-of-the-way place where Fluffy won’t be disturbed. No one wants to do their business in a crowded, noisy area!


Who wants to use a dirty bathroom? Not your cat, that’s for sure! Make sure you scoop out your cat’s litterbox on a regular basis to remove waste, and change the litter out entirely every week to make sure things stay fresh and clean. Cats may avoid their litterbox entirely if it’s not up to their standards!

Negative Conditioning

If your cat was startled while using her box earlier in life, she might be afraid to use it now. Talk to your veterinary professional or an animal behaviorist if you think your cat is having this problem.

Want more advice on your cat’s bathroom habits or behavior? Don’t hesitate to call your vet Colorado Springs, CO. We’re here for you!

How to Keep Your Dog’s Food Fresh

Let’s face it—dog food isn’t cheap! Keeping your dog’s food as fresh as possible helps it to last longer, ultimately saving you money. Below, your Glendale, AZ vet offers a few quick tips.

General Tips

The enemies of your dog’s food are moisture, light, and heat. If Fido’s food is overexposed to these factors, it may go bad. This is why it’s always best to store your dog’s food in a cool, dry, relatively dark spot. It’s the best way to avoid your dog’s food going to waste!

Dry Food

Try storing your dog’s dry food in an airtight container, or in the same packaging it came it. This is a good way to ensure that Fido’s kibble doesn’t become stale. Ask your vet about other great ways to make sure that your dog’s dry food stays fresh.

Wet Food

If unopened, cans of wet dog food can stay good for a long time, especially if they’re stored in a cool, dry, dark place. Once opened, the wet food should stay good in your refrigerator for about a week.

Want even more advice on keeping your dog’s food fresh? Call your animal hospital Glendale, AZ today for further tips.